Parents too guilty to go private? It’s a simple choice to make!

Here’s my take on a story that appeared on BBC education

Parents too guilty to go private

An elite private schools leader says parents are made to feel it is morally unacceptable to pay for an education.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/education-24334356

I don’t know why representatives of private schools at their conferences bother to try to cause minor controversy in order to get into the press. Is not every private school in the country over-subscribed? As a parent I know that all you want for your children is the best opportunity possible.

I was state educated, thoroughly enjoyed school, have retained many friends and achieved good qualifications. My positive feelings about my school years leans me towards the state sector because that is my experience, not because of any kind of stance. I have friends who were privately educated, some of whom boarded, who also had a very positive experience and wish to replicate that for their children.
There are obviously people who find private education morally unacceptable; I wonder what their attitude would be after a windfall?
Keeping an open mind and checking your bank statements is probably the way forward.

 

 

 

Start education at age 6 or 7 is a good idea!!

Here’s my take on the following story from BBC education

School should start above age five

Children should not start formal school lessons until the age of six or seven, a group of educationalists says.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/education-24058227

 

I broadly agree with this report. With young children of my own I can see how they would benefit from less formal schooling in the early years. An early start to the ‘three Rs’ also means that the spectre of super competitive parents begins earlier in a child’s, life bringing with it the associated pressures.
Younger children should be allowed to play more; it helps them develop as people and the interaction that it inevitably entails will help to build their social skills.
Perhaps Elizabeth Truss should meet up with her Parliamentary colleagues to discuss how the gap between rich and poor can be narrowed through good governance rather than framing educational issues against a social background.
Talking about testing and evaluating reception age children is truly idiotic – let the teachers teach. Just more political nonsense.

 

 

 

 

Making the grades…even better!

Private tuition really can deliver the desired results!

A snapshot survey of around 50 tutors and pupils, conducted following the latest round of GCSE and A Level results by Kensington & Chelsea Tutors and associated online platform Webtutornet, has revealed that private tuition can boost predicted results by at least two clear grades.

In just under 80% of cases pupils studying for GCSEs, A Levels and AS Levels have seen a significant increase on the results they were expecting prior to embarking on a period of private tuition.

Nevil Chiles, who founded K&C Tutors in 2002 and Webtutornet in 2012, commented: “There’s a clear trend here that reveals the impact of private tuition that is delivered either face to face or through online sessions.

“Pupils that were predicted a C or D in specific subjects by their school were able to achieve an A or B following at least five sessions of private tuition and that is despite the myriad of changes imposed on their education in recent years.

“The one to one learning approach, delivered by qualified and fully vetted tutors, gives pupils more time to digest and understand complex issues that were perhaps not made completely clear within the classroom environment,” added Nevil who has also seen an increase in pupils and their parents requesting an online tuition variation delivered through Webtutornet.

“Clearly online tuition is the way forward with more and more of today’s media savvy Facebook generation of young people opting for private tuition delivered using a safe and secure online approach such as that offered by Webtutornet,” concluded Nevil who has worked within the education sector for well over two decades.

For more details visit www.webtutornet.com and www.kctutors.co.uk

ENDS

Private tuition risks learning gap… cuts take their toll!!!

COMMENT FROM NEVIL CHILES, MD OF K&C TUTORS & WEBTUTORNET

BBC website story http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-23973213

It has to be true that pupils receiving extra help will be at an advantage.

For almost all students receiving private tuition there will be a cost and so cold hard economics will obviously come into play.

Here at K & C Tutors we were involved with Westminster Council in a scheme called Making Good Progress which gave struggling pupils ten hours of both and English and Maths tuition during school time and funded by the government. Unfortunately the scheme ended with the sweeping public cuts following the recent economic downturn.

Surely this kind of project is the way forward to bridge the gap?

One exam stream for each subject needed!

More pupils taking GCSEs earlier

http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/education-23521378

The fact that students are retaking subjects using different examination boards once again clearly outlines the shortfalls in the present system.

There should be only one examination stream for each subject in compulsory education. Otherwise, how can we possibly compare pier groups accurately?
Taking exams early is often used by schools to attempt to get struggling students through and giving them the opportunity to retake in the year that they really should have been taking the qualification. This is gaming the system but with schools involved in an inquisition-type system with league tables it is a natural thing to do. The only way to prevent this happening is to implement strict age guidelines for taking examinations.

Only in exceptional circumstances should children in the incorrect age band be allowed to sit the exams.

Summer tuition? The key is balance!

Here’s my take on a recent story on the BBC education news site…

Summer tutoring awaits many pupils

http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/education-23465178 >

I must say that despite being the owner of a tutoring company I find this trend slightly worrying. When I swap my business hat for my parent hat and look at my children enjoying their summer break I find myself being delighted that they are having such a great time in the sunshine. Obviously it is important to keep up with reading and summer homework but I also think that a break is good, especially for younger children.
We are living in a very competitive world and all parents should want their children to maximise their potential. For some the summer break may be a good time to help a struggling student, the key is getting the balance right.

 

Pupils ranked at 11..disappointing and destructive

Here’s my take on the recent news that 11-year-old pupils will be ranked against peers…

** Pupils face national rankings at 11 ** Primary school pupils in England could be ranked directly against their peers across the country, under plans to change performance measures.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/education-23334334

Disappointing and destructive is exactly how I see these proposals! Has this really been thought through? Raising the standard to an 85% pass mark of an assessment that hasn’t even been decided upon yet??

As a father of three children I feel strongly that to constantly label younger children is very damaging especially to those that are doing less well.
Surely this measure would mean a huge increase in workload for already overworked teaching staff. Why do politicians keep making new policies which are obviously just measures to try to demonstrate that they are doing something.

Please can we let teachers teach not pile them high with more bureaucracy.