MUM’S THE WORD ON ONLINE TUITION GROWTH

The rapid growth in online private tuition over the past few years is no surprise to mother-of-three Erica Rifat from Oxford!

 

“This is the way the Facebook generation have got used to communicating and it’s a process they’ve become very comfortable with as opposed to the parents who are still, on the whole, coming to terms with this sort of technology,” explained Erica, one of whose daughters has been using Webtutornet to top up her knowledge of Maths.

 

“Whilst I’m not exactly a technophobe it still feels that this technology is like something out of Tomorrow’s World and I’m sure that’s the case for many parents. It’s a sign of the times and the way the web is becoming increasingly ingrained in our lives. For children today all of this is completely normal.

 

“I know there’s a lot of Skype style face-to-face tuition solutions out there for parents and pupils that might be too busy to arrange a home tutor visit so this offers a convenient way of adding to their classroom education.

 

“The single most important consideration as a parent is that the system is safe and secure and that the tutor involved has been vetted by the tuition facilitator and I know that Webtutornet, through Kensington and Chelsea Tutors, take this aspect very seriously.

 

“You have to have peace of mind if you are to entrust your child’s education into the hands of a relative stranger online and I found it important personally to chat initially online with the tutor that we use. That puts your mind at rest.

 

“Secondly you must be confident that the information shared during the lesson remains confidential and secure and this is very much the case with solutions such as Webtutornet.

 

“Since then each and every lesson has gone very smoothly and it’s a simple and easy way of delivering private tuition.

 

“Another great advantage of an approach like Webtutornet is that the lesson is at a fixed time mimicking the discipline required within a school environment or for a home tuition visit. Your child has to be ready to start or they may miss part of the lesson and this is crucial to structuring their understanding.

 

“Finally I no longer have to drive across town and drop my child off at a tutor’s house and be left to twiddle my thumbs for an hour or so. It cuts out all of that hassle,” added Erika who admitted to having test trialled other online systems.

 

There’s also significant advantages from the tutor’s perspective as Angad Rihal, the maths teacher engaged by Erika, explained: “Webtutornet is a truly bespoke solution that has been developed for the student with teaching in mind. The ease of use clearly shows it has been masterminded by people in the industry and is far superior to just using dabble board or Skype.

 

“This is finally bridging the gap between the internet and private teaching which is long overdue and fitting given the tech savvy zeitgeist.

 

“It also saves a lot of time on travelling to the homes of students which, with traffic the way it is, can be a priceless advantage,” added Angad

 

Each tutor and pupil who sign up to Webtutornet receive a special pack containing a webcam, earphones and microphone and a pen with mousemat that allows for tutor and pupil to share resources that are stored securely online.

 

The Webtutornet system has been two years in development according to the man behind it. Nevil Chiles, founder of Kensington and Chelsea Tutors a decade ago, has seen demand for private tuition sky rocket over the past ten years

 

“Online delivery is the natural next step in the evolution of private tuition and there’s a number of different businesses and websites that specialise in providing face to face education through the web.

 

“Coming from the perspective of a father of three it was very much my priority to design a system that countered all of the concerns that a parent might have and safety and security have always been my number one objective,” added Nev.

 

Erica concluded: “My daughter and I thought our tutor Angal was brilliant and by far the best Maths tutor she has had. The proof is in the pudding and she performed far better than expected in the exam for which she was preparing.

 

“Webtutornet is a fun way to learn for children and tutors, such as Angal,  create engaging lessons that really enhance the learning process. It couldn’t be more simple, or secure, and I would encourage parents everywhere to give it serious consideration.”

 

Nevil’s brother, ITV Sport presenter Adrian Chiles, is another convert to Webtutornet: “You can learn anything, anytime, anywhere and it’s so simple even I can understand it!”

 

Adrian presents a number of online videos that seek to explain the Webtutornet way in more detail. For more information visit www.webtutornet.com and follow @webtutornet on Twitter.

ENDS

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Ofsted wrong to tamper with teachers’ pay!!!

Teachers must work harder row 
A teachers leader has criticised England’s chief inspector of schools after he said they must work extra hours if they want a pay rise.
It is not and should never be within Ofsted’s remit to tamper in teachers’ pay. I entirely agree with the teaching unions; they should stick with standards and not have their political strings pushed and pulled from above.
Follow on Twitter @webtutornet / @kandctutors

Income Inequality and the Death of Trickledown

A lot of lessons to be learnt here!

Job Market Monitor

On September 12, 2012, the Census issued its report on Income, Poverty, and Healthcare Coverage in the United States: 2011. While the full report has some nice charts, one that was conspicuously missing was on income inequality. The data for such a chart was in the tables, and so I was able to construct the chart above from them. Mean household (not individual) income for each quintile (20%) is expressed in real (inflation-adjusted) dollars.

20120916-095829.jpg

One feature that jumps out at you are how relatively flat mean income has been for the bottom 80% over the last 45 years and how much it has grown for the top 20%, from an already high baseline. I thought this merited some further investigation.

If you look at the far left, in 1967, the income difference between the quintiles of the bottom 80% was remarkably similar, less than $17,000 between each group ($16,679 between…

View original post 287 more words

VOCATIONAL ELEMENT TO NEW BACCALAUREATE NEEDED!

I think that this announcement is broadly very positive. Getting rid of GCSEs is monstrously overdue. We do need more rigorous testing and we do need single board examinations.
However, extending education for all up to 18 is a mistake. There will always be students who perform badly in academic examinations for a wide variety of reasons. Why is there not a vocational element built in to these changes?
Give academically weaker students the opportunity to study mainstream subjects… they will probably be thankful for it in later life (if not so at the time!). but also let such students study towards skills that will make them employable when they leave school.
Why can’t we have students studying towards being electricians or carpenters alongside the traditional subjects? Let’s not have weaker students ‘catch up’ until they are 18. Armed with a grounding in a trade they could leave school at 16 and find meaningful employment.
Also, why do we have to jump on the Baccalaureate band wagon? Can we not at least be original and not confuse it with all the others?
Follow me on Twitter @kandctutors @webtutornet

Symptoms of a bankrupt GCSE system…

Heads say exam watchdog failed
http://www.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-/news/education-19556772

From the ridiculous to the back peddling. This whole situation with the grading of English GCSEs is a disgrace. How can there ever be any justification for changing grade boundaries for an identical exam in such a short space of time? This is just another symptom of the bankruptcy of the GCSE system; please let’s sweep it away to make way for worthwhile examinations.

Exploring the ties between Sociology and Health: British Sociological Association MedSoc Annual Conference 2012

SAGE Connection

Emma Milman, Assistant Books Editor

I attended the British Sociological Association MedSoc annual conference this week at the University of Leicester. The conference is an opportunity for academics, researchers, students and practitioners worldwide to come together to explore the nexus between sociology and health.

Cathy Lloyd, Sharon Boden and Sarah Earle, all based in the Faculty of Health and Social Care at the Open University, presented a poster on the health services experiences of women with diabetes during pregnancy and childbirth. The poster was based on a project run recently, in which the authors hosted an informal discussion group where women had an opportunity to discuss their own experiences. One of the key findings of the research was that the women involved in the project felt that the medical treatment for diabetes they had received whilst pregnant had dominated their pregnancy. The authors have now submitted…

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Inequalities in America – 288 times times richer

Job Market Monitor

The wealth gap between the richest Americans and the typical family more than doubled over the past 50 years.

In 1962, the top 1% had 125 times the net worth of the median household. That shot up to 288 times by 2010, according to a new report by the left-leaning Economic Policy Institute.

That trend is happening for two reasons: Not only are the rich getting richer, but the middle class is also getting poorer.

Most Americans below the upper echelon have suffered a decline in wealth in recent decades. The median household saw its net worth drop to $57,000 in 2010, down from $73,000 in 1983. It would have been $119,000 had wealth grown equally across households.

The top 1%, on the other hand, saw their average wealth grow to $16.4 million, up from $9.6 million in 1983. This is due in large part to the growing income inequality…

View original post 197 more words